ohio injured worker

Our client suffered catastrophic injuries including an amputation of his left arm at work while operating a large milling machine into which he fell. We alleged that the employer deliberately disabled the interlock device (“kill” switch) which would turn off the powerful rotational spindle and operating table when the door was opened to inspect the set up. It […]

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The Ohio Constitution and workers’ compensation laws grant the employer immunity from negligence lawsuits brought by employees who suffer injuries in the course of and arising out of employment with that employer. The first exception is where there is a non complying employer who fails to establish or maintain workers compensation coverage or fails to […]

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It appears that big business interests and the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation(BWC) are ready to support a new workers compensation law which effectively takes away the rights of injured workers to choose their own doctors to treat them for their work injuries. This will ultimately result in the establishment of medical clinics filled with ultraconservative […]

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 Ohio Workers Compensation & Personal Injury Law In past blogs, we have pointed out significant differences between the types of damages recoverable in an Ohio workers compensation case and in an Ohio personal injury case. A recent workers compensation case decided by the Ohio Supreme Court reinforces the limited recovery for psychological conditions which develop […]

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Recently, the Ohio BWC LSS Executive Committee authorized partial settlement of Ohio workers compensation claims involving state fund claims.This is good news for injured workers who might be interested in settling the compensation portion of the injury claim but who need to keep the claim open for payment of future medical treatments by the BWC.In […]

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In 1982, the Ohio Supreme Court first held in Blankenship v. Cincinnati Milacron Chemicals, Inc. that an employee had the right to sue the employer for damages for intentional infliction of bodily injury.The Court noted that the employer’s legal immunity had always been for negligent acts and not for intentional conduct.In 1984, the Ohio Supreme Court, […]

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